Category: Photoshoots & Portraits

Jessica Chastain promotes “X-Men Dark Phoenix” in Moscow, Russia!

Jessica Chastain promotes “X-Men Dark Phoenix” in Moscow, Russia!

Jessica Chastain was in Russia to promote her upcoming movie “X-Men Dark Phoenix” in Moscow, Russia. She joined her co-star James Mcavoy at the press day and the photocall on May 20.

During her stay in Russia, she also was photographed by Zaur Tedeev for Harper’s Bazaar Russia.

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Appearances & Public Events > 2019 > May 20: Press day for “X-Men Dark Phoenix” in Moscow, Russia

Appearances & Public Events > 2019 > May 20: X-Men: Dark Phoenix photocall in Moscow, Russia

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 > #006 Harper’s Bazaar Russia

Vanity Fair │Jessica Chastain: The Time Traveller

Vanity Fair │Jessica Chastain: The Time Traveller

Vanity Fair

Moving from one strong role to the next frequently takes Jessica Chastain into the inspiring territory of time and space which, she tells Sarah Edworthy, we can all use to explore what we are truly capable of.

Like many kids growing up in the 1980s, Jessica Chastain’s first watch was a Swatch. “That was the big collector’s item, and we would wear more than one at a time,” she recalls. “I had a bunch of them. One was lime green, one was pink… I took pride in my watches. They made me feel like a grown-up, especially going to school where you feel like you have no control of your time, when your schedule is laid out in front of you each day. With a watch, I was master of my calendar.”

Her first timepiece instilled an enduring love of punctuality. “I actually set my watch ahead of time so I can always arrive early,” she says from LA, over a phone line crossing several time zones and, fittingly for this Space issue, as crackly as a radio signal to an orbiting space craft. That early sense of being in control of time, of being aware of its constraints, also informs Chastain’s film work. Drawn to playing strong, single-minded, driven women who want to influence destinies on a social, historic or galactic scale, hers is a career in which timepieces have added a special dimension to the story. “My characters definitely wear watches,” she concurs. Sometimes they are badges of personality or mission, such as the heavy-duty, functional watch she wears when playing an indefatigable CIA operative hunting down Osama bin Laden in Zero Dark Thirty. In the dystopian sci-fi Interstellar, a wristwatch is the device on which the entire plot turns.

Off-set, Chastain at 42 says she now simply wears a watch to complete an outfit. “In my everyday clothes or my eveningwear, I always think whatever I’m wearing could benefit from something on my wrist. I choose a watch to ground my outfit. Watches now are like jewellery pieces to me.” She took this watch-as-detail sensibility into Miss Sloane, the 2017 political thriller directed by John Madden in which her character is a ruthless, work-all-hours political lobbyist in Washington DC, a ticking timebomb of a powerbroker adorned with Piaget wristwear.

“It was important to me that we presented Elizabeth Sloane as someone who wore a watch all the time because she is very structured with her agenda,” she says. “She doesn’t allow herself any time when she is not moving forward in her desire to outsmart the opposition. Her wardrobe is sharp and elegant: the way she presents herself is the armour she wears in a man’s world. And she has really cool watches.”

Eagle-eyed horology experts will appreciate the Piaget watches. By day, Chastain/Sloane wore the Dancer watch in white gold, set with 36 brilliant-cut diamonds, with a sapphire caseback and white gold bracelet. For evening, she wore a traditional oval watch in white gold, set with 24 brilliant-cut diamonds, on a white gold bracelet. She is never without one or the other. As Chastain says, “The engine keeps running on this character.”

A life based around the rigours of film schedules calls for a certain amount of laissez-faire. Each film involves stepping into a time warp. “Everything gets turned on its head,” she says. “We could have our lunch break at 6pm or at midnight, depending on what we’re shooting. For me, it’s usually a question of ‘do I have enough time to do all the things I want to do?’ Last year I made four films and my personal and work life was very scheduled. It was important that it matched up and that there was time to do every-thing in a manner that would benefit the film and myself.”

To many, Chastain seemed to rocket into recognition in 2011 with the release of six films, including Coriolanus with Ralph FiennesThe Tree of Life opposite Brad Pitt, and The Help, a role for which she won multiple award nominations. The reality, she says, was a slow, steady ascent, fuelled by a packed CV. “It took a long time before I got the chances to audition for films that I was excited about being in,” she says. “Films hovered. Or stalled. It took a while for films to come out… And then I was busy, busy, busy making up for the opportunities I had missed.”

Around the same time as her Swatch-watch phase, Chastain recalls watching Alien. She has often described Sigourney Weaver’s performance as a kickass crew member aboard the spaceship Nostromo as a lightbulb moment: “I realised for the first time that there could be more than one kind of role for an actress—that a woman could be this fully realised, active, multi-dimensional character. And she couldn’t only be all of that, she could also be a hero.” Thirty-odd years later, Chastain got the call from Ridley Scott herself, for The Martian, and was cast as Melissa Lewis, the captain of a mission to Mars.

From being master of her school schedule, Chastain time-travelled to being a master of the universe, drawn to sci-fi roles in Interstellar and The Martian because of directors Christopher Nolan and Ridley Scott. “I was already interested in space, but I knew those directors were going to tell a fascinating story and I was going to learn a lot,” she says. “Interstellar ignited my interest, opening my mind to the idea that space is the great unknown and there is so much we can learn about ourselves when we explore the galaxy.” She recommends The Science of Interstellar, a book by Kip Thorn, a theoretical physicist who helped with the concept of the movie. “It explains all the space-time theories in our film and how they interconnect, and I found it fascinating.”

By showing Einstein’s theory of relativity as a human story, Interstellar achieves the actress’s goal: to make you see the world in a different way. Professor Brand, the architect of the NASA mission exploring alternative planets for human survival (played by Michael Caine), is not afraid of death, only of time. The crew consider time as a resource on a par with food or oxygen: it will run out. Like all good thrillers, the denouement is a down-to-the-wire race against time or, in this case, a race to the gravitational flickering of the second hand of a wristwatch.

To prepare for her role in The Martian, Chastain met with “some incredible astronauts and scientists” at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. She was also dismayed by the low profile of women throughout the Space Age. “At NASA, there was a hall-of-fame type wall of all the astronauts who had left Earth and spacewalked. I was really disheartened to see how few were women. Like every industry, the space industry discriminates against women. That is pretty clear when you see the history, visually, up on the wall. We have a real long way to go to make that up.

“All you have to do is research the Mercury 13 programme,” she continues, referring to the 13 American women who were privately funded to participate in the same physiological screening tests as the astronauts selected by NASA in 1959 for Project Mercury.

“You discover that the United States actively discriminated against women. There were female pilots who were scoring much higher on the astronaut tests than the men, and yet they had to go and lobby for the inclusion of women in front of Congress. In 1962, John Glenn, one of the Mercury Seven [the military test pilots selected in 1959 by NASA as the nation’s first astronauts], testified against the women, saying ‘the fact that women are not in this field is a fact of our social order’. Great strides are being made now, but we have a long way to go to make up for the discrimination of women who were never allowed to achieve their ambitions.”

Chastain hopes that a young girl could see her in The Martian and be inspired to join NASA. “Or not just join NASA, but maybe be a leader, the commander of a mission to Mars,” she says. “When you see these depictions of strong women in the media then the idea of a woman leading a space mission doesn’t seem like it’s out of reach. I feel a responsibility in the roles I take. My goal is for a young girl to see that and step forward herself.”

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Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 > #004 Vanity Fair

Marie Claire │The Change Makers: Constance Wu, Ava DuVernay, and Jessica Chastain

Marie Claire │The Change Makers: Constance Wu, Ava DuVernay, and Jessica Chastain

Marie Claire

Inclusion. Representation. Diversity. Agency. Equality. On-screen and off-screen, these women are shaping the future of Hollywood.

A little over a year ago, as revelations of misbehavior by powerful men sparked a global reckoning, a group of women in entertainment came together to talk about what they could do to prevent abuse and ensure equity for working women.

The result was Time’s Up, an organization committed to building a world that insists on safe, fair, and dignified work for women of all kinds. What started in Hollywood has grown to a coalition of women spanning industries and geographies, with more women meeting and organizing every day.

Time’s Up Entertainment is now just one of the many affiliates working to solve industry-specific challenges, and the women involved are united in their unwavering commitment to keep fighting until their female peers have the opportunity to reach their full potential at work.

Here, some of the organization’s most engaged women share what inspired their participation, what keeps them motivated in their activism, and how they plan to create lasting change. Please read these stories, and join us on this journey at TimesUpNow.com.

—Nithya Raman, Executive Director of Time’s Up Entertainment

“We’re going on a journey, you and I,” Jessica Chastain says excitedly over the phone as she pulls her car door shut. “I’m taking you on a bunch of errands with me. Grocery shopping, picking up mail, hardware store. Let’s do it!”

Infectious enthusiasm for quotidian domestic chores is not exactly what one would expect from Academy Award–nominated actress, producer, and activist Chastain, who has made a career playing knotty, complicated women—“To me, there’s no such thing as the angel or the good wife or the perfect mother”—a vein she will again mine when she joins the casts of X-Men in Dark Phoenix (out in June) and It: Chapter Two (September) and when she stars as Tammy Wynette in the upcoming biopic George and Tammy.

On the drive to the hardware store, Chastain, 42, reflects on the highs of her past year, listing Time’s Up and the record number of women being elected into office as buoying her optimism, noting, “The public has answered back in a resounding, hopeful way that change is possible and we’re not going to be dictated to by bullies.”

Though heartened that women are refusing to accept “an old-fashioned model of power,” Chastain remains pragmatic, pointing out that no social movement survives without concrete shifts in economic equality (“If you’re not paid the same, you have to work all the time”) and the promotion of women into seats of actual authority. For her part, she’s making sure her projects don’t just reflect different demographics but also deal a fair hand to all parties.

The public has answered back in a resounding, hopeful way that change is possible and we’re not going to be dictated to by bullies.

Her all-woman production company, Freckle Films, focuses on untold stories and women-led casts, as well as a commitment to equal pay, most recently with the spy thriller 355 (which starts filming this summer), where she sidestepped the studio system, independently raising more than $80 million, and insisted all five lead actresses—Chastain, Lupita Nyong’o, Penélope Cruz, Marion Cotillard, and Bing-bing Fan—earn the same fee and hold equity in the film. (Last year, she helped Octavia Spencer quintuple her salary on a comedy they sold by tying Spencer’s deal to hers.)

“I’ve had people tell me, ‘You need to be a little more quiet with all this woman talk,’” Chastain admits, laughing, adding she has no interest in perpetuating damaging sexist tropes about what women should be and do, on- or off-screen. Her dedication to leveling the field extends to crew and head-of-department hires, adjustments that have real-world implications and puncture the oft-repeated lie that filling those jobs with women is “too hard.”

“I agree there are not as many women as men that have the same experience, but that’s because, in the past, women have been actively discriminated against. Male directors who had their first film in Sundance, their next offer is a huge action movie. Women haven’t been given those opportunities, and we need to ask why.”

She goes on to talk about her most recent empowerment epiphany, as she was surrounded by the 355 cast at Cannes last May. “I remember us all holding hands, walking through this crowd of people, this incredible moment of solidarity, and one of the girls whispered, ‘The power of women,’ and I was like, Ohhhh. I realized, wait a minute, we’re the ones who are actually in charge here.”

Along with her political evolution has come a personal one. Chastain quit being a pleaser, realizing her time and energy are currency she should spend more wisely. “I used to be so obsessed with wanting to accommodate others. Like, in the beginning of my career, when I had ideas about my character or a scene, I felt like I had to go through the male actors. I’d go to them and say, ‘Ooooh, what are we going to do?’ And they’d say, ‘Don’t worry. I’ll take care of it.’ They would go to the director and the director would take them seriously.”

Chastain sighs. “I wish I could’ve just bypassed all of that.”

She bypasses it now, working only with people who understand she has no intention of couching her voice or opinions. Still, she wonders what would have happened had she begun advocating for herself sooner.

“When I look back, there are moments when I’m like, ugh,” she says, launching into a story about a male producer who grew hostile and aggressive when she didn’t return his flirtations. “For months, I tried to make it light, laugh it off. Now I wish I had just told him to fuck off.”

I learned it’s impossible to make everybody happy. At the end of the day, just do stuff that you’re proud of and don’t be an asshole.

When asked how she freed herself from the approval matrix, Chastain pauses a beat.

“That’s a hard question because I don’t know that it was even something that I was aware of until I stopped doing it. All of a sudden, I realized, I feel really happy. Why is that? And it was because I was caring less about what others think of me.”

Now she’s concentrating on what she can control, generating work that lifts others and finding creative fuel in everything from long, solitary walks in the countryside to brainstorming inventions for Shark Tank.

“I learned it’s impossible to make everybody happy. At the end of the day, just do stuff that you’re proud of and don’t be an asshole.”

It’s a journey she’s happy to take.

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Photoshoots & Portraits > 2019 > #003 Marie Claire

Magazines & Scans > 2019 > #001 Marie Claire

Jessica Chastain attends the Ralph Lauren fashion show during NYFW

Jessica Chastain attends the Ralph Lauren fashion show during NYFW

Jessica Chastain watched the Ralph Lauren fashion show held during New York Fashion Week on Friday (September 7) in New York City.

More stars were at the event included Anne Hathaway, Allison WilliamsTracee Ellis RossRobert De NiroImogen PootsJames NortonTom Hiddleston, and Rose Byrne

Jessica was joined by her husband Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo.

Bravo @ralphlauren. Thank you for a wonderful evening #RL50, Jessica wrote on her Instagram account to commemorate the brand’s 50th anniversary.

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  Appearances & Public Events > 2018 > Sep 07 │ Ralph Lauren 50th Anniversary show during the NFYC

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > #013 Ralph Lauren

Interview: Jessica Chastain for Grazia France

Interview: Jessica Chastain for Grazia France

We translated Jessica’s interview to Grazia France. In the interview she talks about Time’s Up, her support for movements that support women, about becoming a producer and about her role in ‘X-Men: Dark Phoenix‘.

The interview can be found in our press archive. The interview can be found in our press archive. The article was translated exclusively by Jessica Chastain Online. Please give a link back if reposting.

Actress, fighter and muse to Piaget jewelry, Jessica Chastain turned out to be a spokesperson precious of the female cause.Interview with a modern heroine.

I know you, come here! Jessica Chastain draws me in her arms. This is the sixth time we’ve interviewed the American actress. “I remember the first time, you were pregnant! “, she says. She’s right, it was our first interview, in Deauville in 2014, where she was receiving a tribute. But our first meeting actually dates from February 2012. A villa on the heights of Los Angeles, at a party in honor of Sofia Coppola who had realized the commercial of the Marni collection for H & M. Wandered around the different rooms of the house were Drew Barrymore, Winona Ryder, Liv Tyler. Bryan Ferry was giving a private concert. And then we noticed this sublime redhead actress, sitting on an armchair in the entrance. Alone. Without a photographer to annoy her. Without publicist to make barrage. So we went forward to tell her how much we loved “The Tree of Life“, movie by Terrence Malick who unveiled it to the world in Cannes a few months earlier, where he had won the Palme d’Or. She smiled and blushed. “It was the moment I took aware that my life was changing. It was very exciting,“she recalls. Jessica Chastain did not imagine not then how much. Seven years have passed, two Oscar nominations, a Golden Globe win, collaborations with the greatest directors  –Kathryn BigelowRidley ScottChristopher NolanGuillermo del Toro,Jeff Nichols -, the launch of her own production company Freckle Films. And even a video with Jay-Z,‘Family Feud‘, released in January and directed by Ava DuVernay. (Read more)

 

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  Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > #012 Grazia France

Magazines & Scans > 2018 > #007 Grazia France